A Terminator-style robot can survive a stabbing

Sci-fi fans will know that the Terminator was just a ruthless killing machine because of its effortless ability to heal itself after damage.

Now, engineers at Cornell University in New York may be on their way to recreating this remarkable self-healing ability.

Experts have created a robot that is able to detect when and where it has been damaged and then instantly restore itself.

The small, soft robot, which looks like a four-legged starfish, uses light to detect changes to its surface as a result of wounds.

The tiny robot, which looks like a starfish, is able to detect when and where it has been damaged and then heal itself

How it works?

For self-medication to work, the bot must be able to determine that something needs fixing.

To do this, the researchers used fiber-optic sensors coupled with LED lights that are able to detect subtle changes on the robot’s surface.

These sensors are combined with a polyurethane elastomer containing hydrogen bonds for rapid chemical recovery.

The resulting SHeaLDS – Self-healing Optical Guides for Dynamic Sensing – provides a soft, wear-resistant robot that can self-heal wounds at room temperature without any external interference.

After the researchers punctured one of his legs, the robot was able to detect the damage and self-heal the incisions.

“Our lab is always trying to make robots more stamina and agility, so they run longer with more capabilities,” said Professor Rob Shepherd of Cornell University.

If you make the bots run for too long, the damage will accumulate. How can we allow them to repair or deal with this damage?

While not indestructible, Shepard said the new starfish robot — which is only about five inches long — has similar characteristics to the human body.

“It doesn’t cure well from burning or from things with acid or heat, because that will change the chemical properties,” he said.

“But we can do a good job of healing wounds.”

The team’s X-shaped robot crawls like a starfish thanks to compressed air pumped through its body.

It’s covered in a layer of self-healing fiber-optic sensors, which coupled with LED lights are able to detect small changes on its surface.

In fiber-optic sensors, light from an LED is sent through a structure called an optical waveguide, which directs the light beam in a specific direction.

Also included in the robot is a photodiode, which detects changes in light intensity to determine when and where a material is deformed.

For the actual healing process, they used a polyurethane urea elastomer for his “skin,” which is a transparent, flexible material that includes hydrogen bonds.

Destroyers are able to repair themselves.  Pictured, Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)

Destroyers are able to repair themselves. Pictured, Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)

After researchers punctured one of its legs, the robot was able to detect damage and self-heal the wounds

After researchers punctured one of its legs, the robot was able to detect damage and self-heal the wounds

Soft robot can sweat like humans

Scientists have created robots that “sweat” like humans during challenging tasks to prevent them from overheating.

The researchers developed a technique that allows machines to “sweat” coolant stored around the component responsible for moving and controlling the system.

Robots and machines generate heat as a by-product during tasks, but this can cause them to malfunction if they don’t cool off.

Read more

When cut, their exposed sides become chemically reactive, causing the crosslinked polymer chains to realign so that they heal.

The researchers say that so-called SHeaLDS technology – ‘self-healing light guides for dynamic sensing’ – allows for a soft, damage-resistant robot that can self-heal wounds at room temperature without any outside interference.

In their experiments, they punctured one of the robot’s legs six times, after which the robot was able to detect damage, self-heal each wound in about a minute and keep moving.

The robot can also independently adapt its gait based on the damage it sensed, such as the “danger animal flight response”.

The team now wants to integrate the robot with machine learning algorithms that are able to recognize different “haptic events” that might damage it.

In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, they say:

“Damage information is essential in damage-prone environments, such as space suits and supersonic parachute monitoring in space, as well as applications where device longevity is preferred, such as wearables for human-machine interaction.”

The robot is covered in a layer of self-healing fiber-optic sensors, which paired with LED lights are able to detect small changes on its surface.

The robot is covered in a layer of self-healing fiber-optic sensors, which paired with LED lights are able to detect small changes on its surface.

In general, soft robots are made of flexible materials, inspired by the soft tissues that make up humans and other organisms.

The problem is that the soft materials used make them susceptible to damage from sharp objects or excessive pressure.

Through self-healing, robots can repair soft-bodied systems in certain environments, such as space suits that have been hit by space debris or underwater equipment.

Further development of the technology could also allow Terminator-style killer robots, designed for the battlefield, to repair damage sustained during combat.

Soft robots mimic living tissue to allow them to better perform human tasks

Soft robots are systems built from materials that have mechanical properties similar to those of living tissue.

# Soft robots are made of flexible materials, inspired by the soft tissues that make up humans and many other organisms.

Their flexibility allows them to be used in a wide variety of applications, from grabbing delicate, soft objects in the food industry to performing minimally invasive surgery.

They can also play an important role in creating lifelike prostheses.

However, the soft material also makes them susceptible to damage from sharp objects or excessive pressure.

Damaged components must then be replaced to avoid the robot hitting the scrap heap.

In 2017, experts at Vrije Universiteit Brussels (VUB) said they had created artificial skin intended to mimic nature’s self-repairing capabilities, allowing robots to recover from ‘wounds’ sustained while carrying out their duties.

Professor Bram Vanderburgt of BruBotics VUB, who worked on plastics, said: “The research results open up promising prospects.

“Not only can robots be made lighter and safer, but they will also be able to operate longer autonomously without the need for constant repairs.”

To make her artificial flesh, the scientists used gel-like polymers that melt into each other when heated and then cooled.

When damaged, these materials first restore their original shape, and then completely heal.

This principle has been applied in three self-healing robotic components; A gripper, a robotic hand, and an artificial muscle.

These flexible pneumatic components were worn under controlled conditions to test whether the scientific principle also worked in practice.

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