Patagotitan Mayor: A Titanosaurus Displayed at the Natural History Museum

Big Dinosaur: Huge Prehistoric Beast Skeleton Bigger Than A Blue Whale And Heavier Than Debbie Duploks Will Be On Display At Museum Of History

  • Titanosaurs were a group of giant, long-necked, plant-eating dinosaurs
  • Giant dinosaurs were found on all continents 100 million years ago
  • The new gallery will only fit inside the enormous 30-foot-tall Waterhouse Gallery

For those wondering just how big the Natural History Museum’s new dinosaur was, the clue is in the name.

A skeleton of a titanosaur, the most complete giant dinosaur ever discovered, will be on display next year.

The exhibit is four times heavier than the museum’s famous Dippy the Diplodocus, and 40 feet longer than the blue whale, Hope.

Patagotitan Mayor, to give the titanosaur its Latin name, would only fit inside the enormous 30-foot Waterhouse gallery.

Titanosaurs were a diverse group of giant, long-necked, plant-eating dinosaurs that were found on all continents 100 million years ago.

What are titanosaurs?

Titanosaurs were the last large group of sauropod dinosaurs before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, about 65 million years ago.

Like other sauropods, titanosaurs were herbivorous tetrapods with long tails, long necks, and small heads.

However, their bodies were more stocky and their limbs produced a wider stance than other sauropods.

Titanosaurus fossils are found on all continents except Antarctica and include about 40 species.

The group contains the largest known land animals, some approaching the size of whales.

“Compared by weight to more than nine African elephants, this stellar specimen will inspire visitors to care for some of the planet’s largest and most vulnerable creatures, who face similar challenges of survival,” said museum paleontologist Professor Paul Barrett.

Titanosaurs were the last large group of sauropod dinosaurs before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, about 65 million years ago.

Like other sauropods, titanosaurs were herbivorous tetrapods with long tails, long necks, and small heads.

However, they differed from other sauropods, in that the bodies of titanosaurs were stocky and their limbs were more broad than other sauropods.

Titanosaurus fossils are found on all continents except Antarctica and include about 40 species.

The group contains the largest known land animals, some even approaching the size of modern whales.

Discovered at the London Museum in South America, Patagotite is estimated to be 121 feet long and weigh 65 tons. It was loaned to the United Kingdom by Argentina.

“We are very excited that Patagotitan, the most complete giant dinosaur ever discovered, is making its European debut here at the Natural History Museum, Home of the Dinosaurs,” says Dr. Alex Burch, Director of Public Programs at the museum.

A skeleton of a titanosaur, the most complete giant dinosaur ever discovered, will be on display next year.

A skeleton of a titanosaur, the most complete giant dinosaur ever discovered, will be on display next year.

Discovered at the London Museum in South America, Patagotite is estimated to be 121 feet long and weigh 65 tons.  It was loaned to the United Kingdom by Argentina

Discovered at the London Museum in South America, Patagotite is estimated to be 121 feet long and weigh 65 tons. It was loaned to the United Kingdom by Argentina

“Our fascination with dinosaurs provides the perfect opportunity to inspire and inform the next generation about the natural world, empowering them to work for the planet.”

The Egidio Feruglio Paleontological Museum (MEF) is located in Argentina.

What was a dinosaur, where did it come from, and where did it go for a ride?

Dippy the Dinosaur is a set of the first Dipolodocus skeleton ever found, made in the early 20th century from the original in Pennsylvania, USA.

In the displayed position, the skeleton measures 85 feet (26 m) long, 14 feet (4.3) m wide, and 13.7 feet (4.2 m) high.

When it was unveiled at the Natural History Museum in London in 1905, the cast became a star, and has since appeared in newspaper cartoons, news reports, and even played starring roles in film and television.

When fossilized bones were discovered by railroad workers, Debbie based in Wyoming, USA, in 1898, newspapers called the discovery “the largest animal ever to have been on Earth.”

Dippy is one of 10 replicas of the original in museums around the world, including Paris, Berlin, Vienna and Moscow.

Debbie, the Tyrannosaurus is a cast of Dipolodocus skeleton that was made in the early 20th century from an original in Pennsylvania, USA.  When it was unveiled in London in 1905, the cast became a star, and has since appeared in newspaper cartoons, news reports, and even played starring roles in film and television.  Pictured is the cast at the Natural History Museum, London, 1905

Debbie, the Tyrannosaurus is a cast of Dipolodocus skeleton that was made in the early 20th century from an original in Pennsylvania, USA. When it was unveiled in London in 1905, the cast became a star, and has since appeared in newspaper cartoons, news reports, and even played starring roles in film and television. Pictured is the cast at the Natural History Museum, London, 1905

Debbie has been on display at the Natural History Museum since the early 1900s, and was displayed most recently in Hintz Hall in the Museum’s entrance from 1979 to 2017.

In 2018, the Dinosaur Skeleton Action Team embarked on a two-year tour of the UK, visiting Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and five regions across England.

The tour aimed to connect the nation with nature and spark the imagination of a new generation of scientists, naturalists and environmentalists.

Diplodocus was a long, herbivorous species that was first described as a new species of dinosaur in 1878 by Professor Othniel C. Marsh at Yale University.

This species lived sometime between 156 and 145 million years ago and belonged to a group called sauropods, meaning “lizard-footed.”

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