If the clouds are clear, head outside to see the lunar eclipse of Mars

If the clouds are clear, head outside to see the lunar eclipse of Mars



Clouds move. Hi Matt. Hi Mike. Yes, absolutely right. And it would be really interesting if we could clear it up in the next couple of hours. It’s the full moon tonight. It’s the last full event here in 2022. It will reach its fullest and brightest. Point shortly after 11:00. And what’s especially cool about the full moon night is just below the full moon. You will be able to see Mars. Let us show you what this looks like later in the night. Do you see this little red ball here? This Mars sits directly below the Moon. What will happen is that the Moon will actually cover Mars around 11:00 or so. You may even be able to see a small red glow sitting right below it. The big question, of course, is that we’re going to clear things up. Let’s look into the future. I think if you live in the Upper Valley and the White Mountains, the Great Northern Mountains, chances are, it’s pretty low with a lot of clouds. The best opportunity to witness this phenomenon takes place in the lake

If the clouds are clear, head outside to see the lunar eclipse of Mars

You may be able to see an unfamiliar event in the sky on Wednesday night as the full moon obscures Mars. Wednesday’s full moon will be the last in 2022 and will reach its fullest at 11:08 p.m. It will happen when Mars disappears behind the full moon. A slight red glow may still be seen near the moon’s edge, and the big question for observers in New Hampshire is whether the weather will cooperate. Clouds and rain are expected to clear up overnight, but the best chance for clear skies by then will be in the Lakes region and points south and east. The odds don’t look great for towns in the Upper Valley, the White Mountains, and the Great Northwood, so if the skies are clear, observers will also be able to see Jupiter and Saturn.

You may be able to see an unusual event in the sky on Wednesday night as the full moon obscures the planet Mars.

Wednesday’s full moon will be the last in 2022 and will reach its full moon at 11:08 p.m.

At about 11 p.m., occultation of Mars on the lunar surface will occur when Mars hides behind the full moon. A slight red glow may still be seen near the moon’s edge.

The big question for observers in New Hampshire is whether the weather will cooperate. Clouds and rain are expected to clear up overnight, but the best chance for clear skies by then will be in the Lakes region and points south and east. For towns in the Upper Valley, the White Mountains, and the Great North Woods, the odds don’t seem like much.

If the sky is clear, observers will also be able to see Jupiter and Saturn.

#clouds #clear #lunar #eclipse #Mars

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