‘Buried treasure’: The latest James Webb telescope image shows the star at birth

A star is being born and scientists are watching for the first time thanks to the “unprecedented capabilities” of the James Webb Space Telescope, according to NASA scientists.

JWST’s technology “sees” through the dust that hides the jets and streams of developing stars, shedding new light on the process and indicating the existence of a developing star that could eventually become another Sun.

“It opens the door to what would be possible in terms of looking at these clusters of infant stars in environments fairly typical of the universe that were invisible until the James Webb Space Telescope,” astronomer Megan Reiter, who wrote the study describing these new discoveries, said in a statement. .

JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGES WOW by showing the incubation of stars and galaxies in a cosmic dance

“We now know where to look next to explore the variables important for the formation of sun-like stars.”

She and her colleagues discovered 24 new jets and 15 possible protostars and were able to identify jets of developing stars. One of those jets is spewing cosmic matter light years away from the newborn. The study said the jets are only active during a short period, from a few thousand to 10,000 years in the millions of years of star formation.

One of the researchers, John Morse of the California Institute of Technology, analyzed the images through various filters provided by JSWT, and said, “It’s like finding buried treasure.”

“As young stars gather material from the gas and dust around them, most also eject a fraction of that material back from their polar regions in jets and outflows,” said a NASA press release. These jets then act like a snowplow, sweeping away the surrounding environment.

The discovery gives new meaning to images taken by the Hubble Space Telegraph 16 years ago. Hubble images, taken in the visible spectrum, showed outflows, but they were largely hidden by dust.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope snapshots reveal a white bubble of activity within the heart of galaxy NGC 3079. The smaller image on the right is a close-up view of the bubble. Astronomers believe that the bubble is being blown away by “winds” (high-speed streams of particles) kicked off during the star-forming explosion.

The telescope’s Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) can see through dust in the atmosphere to reveal parts of the universe that telescopes, like Hubble, can’t see in the visible spectrum.

WHY JAMES WEBB’S SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGES INTERESTED SCIENTISTS ABOUT CLOUDS ON SATURN’S MOON TITAN

April 1, 1995: A 1995 Hubble Space Telescope image of the Pillars of Creation depicts gaseous plumes in M16, the Eagle Nebula.  These plumes of hydrogen and dust act as incubators for new stars.

April 1, 1995: A 1995 Hubble Space Telescope image of the Pillars of Creation depicts gaseous plumes in M16, the Eagle Nebula. These plumes of hydrogen and dust act as incubators for new stars.

Comparing images of the known jet with new images using the filters applied allows scientists to track the speed and direction of the cosmic bombardment. Scientists suggest that the information could help them reveal how our sun formed and how radiation from other stars influenced the evolution of planets like Earth.

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The discovery came as scientists delved into one of the first images from Webb, the Cosmic Cliffs. NASA shared images with the world in July of star formation NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula, which is generating stars.

JWST launched a year ago on Christmas Day.

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