The mansion shown in Harry and Meghan’s Netflix documentary did not belong to them

with With its expansive views of the Pacific Ocean, majestic oak coffered ceilings, and impeccable interior design, this is without a doubt a home fit for royalty.

And viewers of the Netflix series Harry and Meghan might be forgiven for assuming that the couple was photographed inside their £11 million ($13 million) mansion in Montecito, California.

But the Mail on Sunday can reveal that the posh venue was, in fact, a splendid property more expensive than theirs – the £27.3 million ($33 million), 13,599-square-foot, six-bedroom ‘iconic’ Montecito estate mansion, which is currently for sale.

What’s less known is that the mansion once belonged to Mark Schulhoff, CEO of Quadriga Arts, who had previously been accused of racking up $116 million in a scam targeting disabled veterans.

Viewers of the Netflix series Harry and Meghan might be forgiven for assuming that the couple was photographed inside their £11 million ($13 million) mansion in Montecito, California.

According to the estate agent's gushing description of 888 Lilac Lane (pictured) — a nine-minute drive from the real Sussexes¿ home, which they bought in 2020 — the mansion used for filming features a Wimbledon-quality garden, pond, and spa.  Private gym and cobblestone driveways.  It belongs to wealthy businessman and environmental activist Mark Schulhoff

According to the estate agent’s gushing description of 888 Lilac Lane (pictured) — a nine-minute drive from the Sussexes’ real home, which they bought in 2020 — the mansion used for filming features a Wimbledon-quality garden, pool, spa and private spa. Gym and cobblestone fairways. It belongs to wealthy businessman and environmental activist Mark Schulhoff

According to the estate agent’s gushing description of 888 Lilac Lane — a nine-minute drive from the Sussexes’ real home, which they bought in 2020 — the mansion used for filming features a garden, pool, spa, private gym and Wimbledon-quality cobblestones. arcade.

While the couple never actually claimed the house in the Netflix show as their own, its interior, with its crystal chandeliers, soaring 24-foot ceilings and private cinema, drew plenty of commentary.

Prestigious Architectural Digest praised the mansion’s “great room, which is flooded with light from the double-height arched windows that line the rear of the house.”

But others criticized the couple for being “tone-deaf” for filming them inside a luxurious home amid a global cost of living crisis.

“It struck me as a little deaf from filming in such a lavish setting when there is so much suffering in the real world,” said a Hollywood producer.

While the site’s home has its own chicken coop, as does Meghan and Harry’s home, it is no match for the Sussex Palace in one respect. It contains 16 bathrooms, while Lilac Lane only has six.

While the couple didn't actually claim the house on the Netflix show as their own, its interior, with its crystal chandeliers, 24-foot high ceilings and private cinema, drew plenty of comment.

While the couple didn’t actually claim the house on the Netflix show as their own, its interior, with its crystal chandeliers, 24-foot high ceilings and private cinema, drew plenty of comment.

The home is worth more than twice the actual Sussex home in Montecito (above)

The home is worth more than twice the actual Sussex home in Montecito (above)

The criticisms are based on the fact that the house once belonged to a man accused of masterminding a $116 million fraud against disabled veterans.

In 2014, then-New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman conducted an investigation against Schulhoff and Quadriga for creating a fake war veteran named Arnie who suffered brain damage while serving in Afghanistan.

Schulhoff and his company were accused of sending fake mailers to raise money for a charity for the National Veterans Foundation, where they would receive 90 percent of donations.

The investigation found that in 2008 Quadriga only raised $10.1 million on the books, but paid the charity $15.6 million for its services.

It caused the nonprofit to go into debt as Schulhof began racking up 100 percent of its fundraising efforts in order for the DVNF to pay off its debt to the scammers.

In a settlement with the attorney general’s office, Quadriga agreed to pay DVNF $24.6 million.

The company was also ordered to forgive $13.8 million in debt owed by the charity, as well as pay a $9.7 million fine and an $800,000 bill for the investigation.

The total payments went directly to helping the real veterans who were supposed to be getting the help in the first place.

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